Can silence be great? Report from the meeting on the book by Jan Maciejewski

Within a short frame of several meters, we had the opportunity to see something truly touching. We looked at a place that was no longer a temple to an evangelist market. The burning Notre Dame was a candle that attracted attention, and made people take rosaries hidden in their pockets – as Jan Maciegoski said during the premiere of “The Silence of the Cathedral”, just published by Political Theology.

On Tuesday, April 26, at the headquarters of Political Theology of the Mujahideen. Koszykowa event, the premiere of a new book by Jan Maciejewski entitled: “The Silence of the Cathedral”, just published by our publishing house. The discussion was attended by: author of the essay collection, Dariusz Karovic and Michai Zudrzynski from Rzeczpospolita. The interview was conducted by Thomas Herbisch. The meeting can be held thanks to co-financing from the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage from the Culture Promotion Fund – a special purpose government fund. Submitted by Blogpress.

At first, the editor Herbich drew attention to the subtitle of the material in question, asking the author about the importance of columns and images for culture and the role of this form of expression in his work. Jan Masiewski recalled the origins of the word pole Meaning “a serially published paper,” he described it as a certain permanent character, a literary readiness that accompanies the Creator in everyday life. On the other hand, the images emphasized the dialogic idea, according to which each text was a specific encounter between the author and the hero.

According to Michał Szułdrzyński, we are dealing with something much more than just a set of columns – it is rather a coherent story about the world in which the author lives, set in an original intellectual climate. The editor of Rzeczpospolita also drew attention to the postmodern yearning for truth stemming from texts.

Jan Masiewski recalled the origins of the word pole meaning “a paper published in a series”, describing it as a certain permanent disposition, a literary readiness that accompanies the Creator in everyday life

Dariush Karowicz, in turn, described Jan Macigoski’s writing as knowing and respectful of the limits of what can be interpreted. Compare them to a kind of press that does not admit a secret.

Thomas Herbsch then drew attention to the issue of fidelity that appears in the articles. Jan Maciejwski took up this issue in detail referring to the category of “context” coined by Remy Bragg. Fidelity can be understood in relation to a specific person that becomes a specific context. According to Bragg, the greatest drama of modern man extends far beyond his limits. For the Greeks this was a universe, and for the Christians it was formed by God. With the blurring of context, we get bored.

Dariush Karowicz described the writings of Jan Masiewski as knowing and respecting the limits of what can be interpreted.

The author of The Silence of the Cathedral, referring to the presenter’s opening question, noted that choosing one of the initiators of writing: journalistic or literary is more important than choosing a literary genre. He himself tries to create according to the latter, not imposing his view of the world on the reader, but rather trying to bring him closer to the truth together.

Later in the meeting, Jan Maciejewski described the genesis of the title of the presented collection. He spoke of the feelings that accompanied him while watching the pictures of the burning Notre Dame Cathedral and the Parisians praying in front of it. – “Within a short frame of several meters, we had the opportunity to see something real touching. We looked into a place that was no longer a temple to an evangelical market. The burning Notre Dame was like a candle that attracted attention, and made people take rosaries hidden in their pockets.” – summed up.

Thomas Herbsch drew attention to the vision of the day emerging from the book, according to which we live in the “world in between” – meaning, in fact, defeat, but also a happy rebirth. Jan Maciejewski applied this view to Tolkien’s concept of “happy catastrophe”. – “Greatest oicatastrophy There was a cross in world history. The defeat of God, which after three days turned into the greatest victory in the history of the world.” – Added.

The final part of the meeting was devoted to questions from the audience.

The book “The Silence of the Cathedral” is available in our library

Jacek Łagowski’s photo

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