Viking (2022). Film review by Robert Eggers

“Wiking” is a visually stunning brutal thriller about revenge and the masculinity that doesn’t know the word “Let it go.” Robert Eggers took care of the historical details and managed to push you into a chair with the battle scenes, but the story he told isn’t addictive. However, it does not interfere in any way with the viewing that I recommend in the cinema and not on the laptop screen.

  • Director Robert Eggers’ movie “Viking” will premiere on April 22, 2022. The film tells the story of Amelith, who is sworn to avenge the murder of his father.
  • Alexander Skarsgård played the main role in the film. In addition to him, we will see on screen, among others Nicole Kidman, Willem Dafoe, Anya Taylor-Joy (“The Queen’s Gambit”)
  • The film is impressive with its fight scenes, great Icelandic atmosphere, and polished details based on historical finds. On the screen we can see among other things a match of the brutal traditional sport of the Vikings – Knattleikr
  • You can read more stories like this on the Onet homepage

After the screening of “Viking”, the wolves, which usually fight in my head, can live in harmony. Someone got what is usually required from Viking movies, namely animal cruelty and many ax cut wounds. The second left the cinema convinced that Robert Eggers’ film showed how devastating an upbringing based on the cult of power, war, and corrupt morals, which it would be more appropriate to call training. “Wiking” is something on the borderline of a cinema viewing and sensory experience, because the cold Icelandic climate automatically lowers the temperature of the cinema hall by a few degrees, and shots of the majestic volcano during an eruption rightly foreshadow in some that it will become really hot and suffocating. If you’re planning on waiting for the cinema boom and watching “Wiking” in the quiet of your home on a laptop twelve inches or so, you might regret it.

“Wiking” tells the story of Amelith (Alexander Skarsgård), whose life purpose is contained in the phrase “Avenge the father. Save the mother. Kill Fjölnir,” repeated like a mantra. His father died at the hands of his brother at the beginning of the film. Young Amelith escapes death at the hands of his tormentors, sails the raging sea in a small boat and vows revenge. Moments before his father’s death, the boy undergoes a mystical initiative that makes him a Nordic man capable of taking the throne after his father. The Scandinavian, that is, the one who does not forgive the mistakes he has caused and for whom the only righteous death is division on the battlefield.

The hero built this way takes off into the world and the next time we see him is several years later, as a full-grown warrior, moments before the attack on the village of wine, the god of the soul. Then there is the Cruel Carnage, which is watched with some annoyance, as the director does not think to explain his characters – we are silent witnesses to brute beasts, and the wolf metaphor extends from a group howl before jumping gates, by literally biting an enemy, to a heavy dog ​​panting after finishing the work. Robert Eggers doesn’t try to elicit sympathy for the main character, but rather documents her as a wild animal miraculously unnoticed by the camera operator moving behind him. The viewer can then decide for himself whether the life path of a berserk, warrior from the north in the skin of an animal, not knowing the word “leave”, is worth pursuing or not at all.


Still image from the movie “Wiking”

Photo: Aidan Monaghan, Focus Features

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A certain change in the life of the main character may be brought about by Olga, the clever Słowianka played by Anya Taylor Joy (“The Queen’s Gambit”). This is perhaps the most expressive character in the entire movie, which we can sympathize with on many points and which he sincerely encourages. Perhaps because she is the only character whose moral compass is similar to our moral compass, so you can quickly pick up a certain thread with the heroine. It’s different with Queen Godrin, played by Nicole Kidman. We don’t see her on screen very often, but even on these sets, we manage to create an interesting and mysterious character that gives us one of the movie’s most exciting twists. Maybe it’s just me, but I really love when Kidman’s characters have something unpredictable and even diabolical about them, so I was glad Gudrn was a much more complex character than the first scenes I portrayed.

Still image from a movie

Still image from the movie “Wiking”

Photo: Aidan Monaghan, Focus Features

Fighting in many forms

Duel fans will find more fun later in the movie – not only will we get to struggle with a ghost-like boss fight in “Dark Souls”, but also a match of traditional Viking sports. Knattleikr soccer games are a sophisticated blend of rugby, quidditch and wooden club fighting (with the distinct advantage of breaking sticks). It’s hard knowing even the entire script to spoil the fun of the show that comes from other aspects of the movie, but I have to keep quiet about a very nice fight scene, which nonetheless is crucial to the plot. I can’t help but write that it’s worth waiting patiently, and despite the visual mastery, most of the work is done by sound.

Still image from a movie

Still image from the movie “Wiking”

Photo: Aidan Monaghan, Focus Features

More and less from “Braveheart”

The strength of the Eggars movie is the visual layer and subtlety of presenting the world of the Vikings. If you want to expand your knowledge and knowledge of the legend inspired by the scene of literally biting your opponent on the battlefield, please refer to the interview that the director gave to Slate magazine, where he talks about his inspiration. The historical backbone is flawlessly built, but ironically in “Wiking” I miss the captivating story the most. Of course, I don’t like Eggars to do another “brave heart”, but more expressive characters and a more intense plot definitely wouldn’t hurt. When we take into account recent premieres, David Lowery’s “Green Knight” has fared much better in this regard. However, if I had to choose between another movie that expresses the grandiose spirit and “Wiking”, which takes these myths straight, I would definitely choose the latter, and “With Fire and Sword” I would watch next Christmas.

See also: The genetic profile of the Poles is surprising. Do we have a Viking Jane?

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